GENERAL ADVICE FOR STUDENTS
If you’re interested in the SAT, ACT, or another standardized test, don’t just pick a date out of thin air and head off to the testing center. Strategy is involved in preparing for college and university exams.

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GENERAL ADVICE FOR STUDENTS
If you’re interested in the SAT, ACT, GRE, or another standardized test, don’t just pick a date out of thin air and head off to the testing center. Strategy is involved in preparing for college and university exams.

Login or Register
Select your online course.

When Should I Take (or Retake) My Test?
If you’re thinking about taking (or retaking) the SAT, ACT, GRE, or another standardized test, don’t just pick a date out of thin air and head off to the testing center. There’s strategy involved in determining the best time to test. The following tips should help you make an informed decision.

Beat Test Stress
You’re in the middle of a test. Your heart is pounding… your breath is quick and shallow. As sweat beads on your forehead, panic begins to drift in. What’s going on?

Just Starting Out?
Your test is looming on the horizon and you need to prepare. Whatever you choose, do something! Almost anyone can bring up his or her scores on tests like the SAT and ACT, but it takes work.

Test Prep Includes Building Vocabulary
Your ability to mimic Webster’s Dictionary isn’t evaluated by most standardized exams, so you won’t be expected to provide definitions for difficult words. However, your vocabulary will come in handy for the many indirect and hidden vocabulary questions you’ll encounter in tests like the SAT and ACT.

Master Standardized Tests
The months preceding college or grad school might sometimes seem like they’re filled with one test after another…PSAT, ACT, SAT, GRE. The subject matter might be different for each of them, but there are some general strategies that can help you conquer any one of them.

All About the SAT
The SAT is a standard college entrance exam that measures skills in math, reading, and writing. The Evidence-Based Reading and Writing sections are 65 minutes of Reading with 52 questions, 35 minutes of Writing and Language with 44 questions. The Math section consists of a 25 minute no calculator section of 20 questions, and a 55 minute calculator section with 38 questions. The total test time is 3 hours and 45 minutes.

Getting to Know the ACT
Your ACT test scores are an important part of your future college plans. As you apply for colleges, the schools will be looking at your test scores to determine if you are ready for college level work, if you meet the criteria to be admitted, and what classes you might be placed in. Since you can take the test multiple times if you need to, many students often take the ACT the first time in their senior year. If you are a freshman or a sophomore right now, this means you’ll be preparing for the test sooner than you think. The first step in preparation is to learn your way around the test, so that you can get an idea of what may be expected of you when you take it.

You Received Your SAT Scores… Now What?
You’ve taken your high school classes, sat through SAT prep and other SAT help, and finally gone through SAT testing. Now you have your scores; what’s next? Unlike school, you can’t “pass” or “fail” the SAT. But that doesn’t mean you’re off the hook! The reason you take the test is to pretty up your college applications, so a passing score is one that’ll get you in.

When Should I Take (or Retake) My Test?
If you’re thinking about taking (or retaking) the SAT, ACT, GRE, or another standardized test, don’t just pick a date out of thin air and head off to the testing center. There’s strategy involved in determining the best time to test. The following tips should help you make an informed decision.

Beat Test Stress
You’re in the middle of a test. Your heart is pounding… your breath is quick and shallow. As sweat beads on your forehead, panic begins to drift in. What’s going on?

Just Starting Out?
Your test is looming on the horizon and you need to prepare. Whatever you choose, do something! Almost anyone can bring up his or her scores on tests like the SAT and ACT, but it takes work.

Test Prep Includes Building Vocabulary
Your ability to mimic Webster’s Dictionary isn’t evaluated by most standardized exams, so you won’t be expected to provide definitions for difficult words. However, your vocabulary will come in handy for the many indirect and hidden vocabulary questions you’ll encounter in tests like the SAT and ACT.

Master Standardized Tests
The months preceding college or grad school might sometimes seem like they’re filled with one test after another…PSAT, ACT, SAT, GRE. The subject matter might be different for each of them, but there are some general strategies that can help you conquer any one of them.

All About the SAT
The SAT is a standard college entrance exam that measures skills in math, reading, and writing. The Evidence-Based Reading and Writing sections are 65 minutes of Reading with 52 questions, 35 minutes of Writing and Language with 44 questions. The Math section consists of a 25 minute no calculator section of 20 questions, and a 55 minute calculator section with 38 questions. The total test time is 3 hours and 45 minutes.

Getting to Know the ACT
Your ACT test scores are an important part of your future college plans. As you apply for colleges, the schools will be looking at your test scores to determine if you are ready for college level work, if you meet the criteria to be admitted, and what classes you might be placed in. Since you can take the test multiple times if you need to, many students often take the ACT the first time in their senior year. If you are a freshman or a sophomore right now, this means you’ll be preparing for the test sooner than you think. The first step in preparation is to learn your way around the test, so that you can get an idea of what may be expected of you when you take it.

You Received Your SAT Scores… Now What?
You’ve taken your high school classes, sat through SAT prep and other SAT help, and finally gone through SAT testing. Now you have your scores; what’s next? Unlike school, you can’t “pass” or “fail” the SAT. But that doesn’t mean you’re off the hook! The reason you take the test is to pretty up your college applications, so a passing score is one that’ll get you in.

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